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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
's set to hit the market in the next few weeks. the ceo of protein sciences joins us with a look at the new drug and what it could mean for the company as it now looks to go public. david: 2012 was a massive year for the markets with the s&p posting its largest gain in three years. will it continue? what's the best play to play it? >> here with a first on fox business look at the firm's 2013 outlook is chad morganlander portfolio manager at stifel nicolaus. thanks for coming on. >> thank you for having me. >> all right, so break it down for us here. what does 2013 look like? what's your outlook? >> well, it is going to look similar to 2012 for the united states for the first quarter or two and then you should see a reacceleration in 2013. capital spending in the united states should improve, household credit growth, home prices are going to start getting a lift, home sales which will be a self-sustaining recovery, something that you haven't seen for several years. david: but after-tax income is going down, is it not? >> well, it will, but historically the consumer has the ability
of the science is done during summer. that's when the animals are here. that's when the day is longest. so there's more opportunity to work. >> reporter: the experts are trying to understand the impact of climate change by examining links between ice volume and wildlife. this unmanned apparatus can check the condition of underwaterce. it can precisely measure thickness and record changes in volume. scientists also use krill as a sort of canary in the coalmine. the small crustaceans live below the ice, and they are a key food source for marine animals. but estimates suggest their population is in decline. antarctic division in tasmaa breeds krill in antarctic conditions. researchers officially change the environment to monitor the impact on crustaceans. they are trying to find out if the thinning of the ice could affect krill numbers. bigger animals at the south pole provide even more data. scientists in the university of tasmania have attached small devices on elephant seals to record their movements and the temperature of the sea where they swim. they're aiming to determine how changes in the i
's research bases in antarctica. during the summer, we can have more than 100 people here. most of the science is done in the summer. that's when the animals are here. there's more opportunity to work. >> reporter: the experts are trying to understand the impact of climate change by examining links between ice volume and wildlife. this unmanned apparatus can check the condition of under water ice. it can precisely measure thickness and record changes in volume. scientists also use krill as a sort of canary in a coal mine. the small crustaceans live below the ice. estimates suggest their population is in decline. researchers artificially changed the environment to monitor the impact on the crustaceans. they're trying to find out if the thinning of the ice could affect krill numbers. bigger animals at the south pole provide even more data. scientists in the university of tasmania have attached small devices on elephant seals to record their movements and the temperature of the sea where they swim. they're aiming to determine how changes in the ice volume and water temperature affect behavior. >>
guide him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> it's a tale of two stories on wall street. the bulls betting on morgan stanley and the bears working to take down the mother of all chipmakers. good afternoon everybody. i'm liz claman. it is the last hour of trading on this friday. countdown to the closing bell begins right now. financial biggie morgan stanley having its best day in 7 month ts. jumping $1.66 in blowout quarter. revenue smashing estimates. one of wall street's heaviest hitters the guy running the show morgan stanley chairman and ceo james gorman in the house gearing up for his one-on-one interview with charlie gasparino. that's coming up in just a few minutes. you don't want to miss that one. i don't care who else interviews james gorman, it is charlie. he is the guy you want to hear interview jim gorman. you have intel, the biggest drag on the dow jones. shares are dropping by nearly 7%. quite an interesting story here. q4 earnings per share topped analyst estimates mar
is really more an art than a science. a forest of beeping monitors can't always tell a doctor if a patient is truly unconscious. >> a way to inject a little current -- >> reporter: the new issue of "the atlantic" on stands today reports on what may be a breakthrough. a new approach that could monitor consciousness itself. >> you don't want the patient to move, to feel any pain, to have any memory. >> reporter: dr. giulio tonino's work looks at the brain. his theory? all the electrical signals -- sight, sound, pain, spreading across the brain -- creates consciousness. think of it as flipping a light switch, with light spilling into all the rooms of your brain. in surgery, anesthesia closes the doors, the lights, the electrical signals can't spread. that's when you are truly unconscious. tonino's new awareness monitor stimulates the brain with an electric current to see if it spreads. a truly unconscious brain would have no reaction. a brain conscious during surgery would. >> you're actually injecting current to the brain and finding out whether the various parts of the brain are talking to
"the christian science monitor." she is the white house reporter for that publication. bachus through the president's day. >> it starts with a religious -- walk us through the president's day. guest: it will start with a religious service, near lafayette square. then they had up to capitol hill. as you said, 11:20, that will be the swearing in. i think that will take place closer to 11:30. then he makes his speech at 11:50. after that, they head into the capitol building for an inaugural luncheon. that is followed by a parade down pennsylvania avenue. in the evening, there are two inaugural balls this year. one is a commander in chief's all for the military, followed by the big inaugural ball. they have cut back from 10 to two. the second inaugural ball will be quite big. it is not quite as much downsizing as they are making it out to be. >> the president is only going to one location? guest: according to the schedule, he is at the first ball at 8:45, and at 9:10, he's at the other ball. he is a quarter years older, maybe he wants an earlier night. host: does the president of many tra
the arkansas of these conversations goes is it begins this sort of a conversation that h.g. wells and science fiction, you realize a few years later, that's what we are doing. you began at the right point about climate change now is integral to every conversation about urban design especially when you are situated on the ocean or a river rising, you say, we've got to do this now there is no question. i see there is a new report coming out if the from the federal government that says there is no question that these climate event did are triggered by climate change. we have to deal with it. we have to think in dramatically different ways. >> it's good to know people have that vision and see the need there. on the gun issue, elliott, i think andrew cuomo comes across as a real mensch and a real leader. do you agree. >> i think it's a good moment for new york state government. i think the next hard question will be when people parse the statute: what does it get done? does it do enough? i think it just is with the president's executive orders, acting is good becau
, a special report, the psychology and science behind cheating. join brooke baldwin right here on cnn. >>> the overall death right from cancer in the united states has dropped 20% from more than 20 years ago. this new report coming from the american cancer society. that means nearly 1.2 million cancer deaths have been prevented in that time. the report also projects there will be 1.6 million new cancer cases this year. but overall cancer cases are declining for most types of cancer. what does this all mean? with me now is chief medical officer and executive vice president of the american cancer society. welcome, doctor. >> hello. how are you? >> so these figures, they are just released this morning and you must be feeling good. >> this is really good news. you can look at survival by the number of people getting cancer a you can see, since survival is increasing we must be doing something well but you can also debate that. nobody can debate it when the number of people dying is actually going down. 1.2 million people alive today that wouldn't have gotten cancer. >> what type of cancer
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade.
and is there science behind the point? >> it is ridiculous. it is common sense to make an announcement or advertisement that you know if you drink too much of this, it will be bad for you. it is like if dr. pepper comes out and says, by the way, not really a doctor, just so you know. >> that's not true though, they are a doctor. >> i didn't do my research. >> personally it sounds like -- and bill you will get the word, but it sounds like nothing more than a clever ploy to put themselves on a higher moral standing than some of the competetors. >> they do advertise on fox news i couldn't disdegree more. i for one have a coconut smile every day. i will say, why not just do a diet coke commercial 1234* that product they make doesn't have calories. and i don't even know anyone who drinks co coca-cola proper anymore. so does andy levy and he is out sick. >> if you have a rum and coke you can't have rum and diet coke. have you tasted that? it is crap. let's go to the next topic. on friday the white house released a response to an on-line petition. it is to build a "star wars" style death star. 25,000 people h
is a student at northeastern university and studying political science. this is the fight back we are talking about. please say a quick word about what it is like trying to navigate through poverty when you are a single mom and what you say to all of those single moms watching right now trying to navigate the same journey. >> thank you for having me. it is not easy to be able to come and leave my baby back. i was feeling sad. i did not want to leave him. this is a fight for plenty of women, and not only single mothers. single fathers out there as well that struggle just as much as i do. [applause] i know plenty of them and they struggle. picture this. you are a single parent, but you have to come up with a way how to feed your family, work at the same time to pay bills, and go to school to get an education to better your life. last year, i only made $8,000 the whole year. my food stamps were cut. that was the only way i was able to feed my son, $85 a month. the average family spends close to $500 or more. you expect me to spend $85 and live with that for my son. we had to be sent to a shelter
to a program to encourage people who attend u.s. universities with science, technology, engineering and mathematics backgrounds to stay in the u.s., use those skills to grow our economy, help our country, rather than go back to their home country. host: the white house sees hope for bipartisan deal on immigration based on what senator marco rubio of florida, republican, has put out there. he's put some ideas out there. do you -- do you endorse liz ideas? guest: i have not spoken to senator rubio yet, but we welcome those ideas. there are others in the house that are working on specific proposals and wider ranging proposals, and we want to take a look at this. you know, we are a nation of immigrants. there is not a person to be found who's a u.s. citizen who can't go back a few generations or several generations and find someone in their family who came to the united states to better their lives. my grandfather came from germany. my wife's parents came from ireland. this is a very, very common thing. we are also a nation of laws. so finding a way to address this issue and fix a very
in the foods and nutritious food ingredients areas. i think those areas are areas where innovation and science really bring a difference to the customers, and they're taking it up and they're utilizing it. i think other areas, there's a wait and see attitude. you know, are we, in this country, going to deal with our deficit? you know, as china comes through their transition in power, they're the two biggest hurdles i see in front of us that we still have to clear to create a real strong economic environment for the world. >> so, the deficit, and the talk that we've heard now coming out of washington, is that we're going to push things back, the debt ceiling will be pushed off essentially for three months. is that good news or bad news? i mean what would you like to see happen right away? >> well, i do think that that just continues the uncertainty. you know, i think if there's a time frame and a time line and they can make real progress that that's a positive. i think to the extent that they just keep -- if they keep moving it out i think that's going to be a negative. you know, certainly it's
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> you're an independent and you sort of said, look, i want this guys to court me as a voter. in that courting process, what should they be doing? how are they going to hook you in? what are you looking for? >> they need to personally come to my house, piers. they need to come over and watch football with me and spend quality face time. i'm no different than an iowa farmer. i deserve the exact same respect as an iowa corn farmer. politics is retail. come to my house. >> a year ago when the absurdity came, rob lowe to talk about the race and his passion about politics. good to have you back. >> none of the candidates took me up on my offer. not one of them came to my house. >> nobody calls, nobody rang? >> i was sad. >> what do you make of the race in the end? >> i was -- i was really surprised that it wasn't closer. >> yeah? >> i can't believe that president obama turned out bigger numbers than he thought -- than a lot of people thought he would. i was surprised. all of a
t day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast! [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. demands actions on guns. >> if there is a step that we can take that will save even one child from what happened in newtown, we should take that step. >> one month after the massacre, what will it take to protect this country's children. also, the courageous father who lost his son to sandy hook. >>> and this crime fighter says the nra has held congress hostage for years. plus, a former congressman and nra point person who says this. >> there is nothing more critical to our nation's well-being than our children's safety. >> why he thinks the way to stop school shootings is to put an armed gun outside the room. >> i wouldn't know what to do with an assault rifle, wouldn't know why i would want one. this "piers morgan tonight". >>> vice president joe biden is expected to hand president obama his recommendations to st
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good evening this is the piers morgan special guns in america. president obama is creation of the second amendment. press secretary jay carney says the president's proposals will be significant. >> the president has made clear that he intends to take a comprehensive approach, including the assault weapons ban, including a measure to ban high-capacity magazine clips, including an effort to close the very big loopholes in the background check system in our country. >> is the white house plan enough? tonight i'll talk to experts on both sides of the gun battle plus victims' families and big city mayors leading the charge for gun control. and consider this. since adam lanza murdered 20 children and six adults at sandy hook at least 917 americans have been killed by guns. while the nra reports an unprecedented surge in membership, up 250,000 over the past month. add to that record sales of ar-15 assault rifles. so what's the solution? more weapons or stricter laws? let's talk about all of that tonight
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> back now on my special "guns in america." we left it on a point you raised there about calling the police. you have an issue with that. >> i wanted to emphasize this because it sharpens the point of our disagreement. people who own guns have kids, they have families. they love them. they've got a different view about how to maintain their individual security. and what we're talking about in response to your comment, call the police, is that there is a window of imminent threat that's recognized by our law of self-defense that says the government's monopoly on violence is something that we create an exception to. >> here is my response. i don't think anybody in this room, or very, very few people -- >> legitimate violence. >> government's monopoly on violence? >> sure. the government -- >> we're not in the violence business. >> no, the government has a monopoly on legitimate violence. the government can execute people. the government can execute pe
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. . >>> welcome back. three minutes before the closing bell rings. want to show you this trading pattern. this has been typical for the last few weeks now where you get the selloff in the morning and then we drift higher the rest of the day, and the feeling, prevailing wisdom is that it's the late afternoon trade, that that's the smart money coming into the market here, and once again that seems to be what's happening here. we're finishing neither highs of the day with the dow gaining about 56, 57 points and, again, any positive close for the dow and s&p a new five-year high. then we wait for more numbers or the bell. google starting to roll over near the close. estimates for their earnings were coming down. initially we heard $10.47. now it's down to 10.42 for google's earnings. we'll see what those look like and ibm will be out about the same time, and as you see, ibm is moving higher towards the close. estimates there, $5.25 per share. around 4:30 ea
and localities offer -- what is their effectiveness? guest: the national academy of sciences put out a report in 2004 and they could not find any benefit. the entire panel agreed on that. you look at what type of guns get turned then and 99% of the guns are not operational. they are just something that people have around, maybe rusting for decades or something like that so they go and get rid of them. host: georgia, republican -- caller: i have three quick points -- i like the contrast between the differences of semi automatic guns. i would like for someone to define what is an assault rifle. they are all mostly semi automatic so why not call them all assault -- all assault weapons so one abandoned. to me, the background check is not for the mental attitude of an individual. guest: i agree with what the caller was saying. if you want to go and ban guns, it should be based on the characteristic of the guns in terms of how they operate. how did they fire bullets, the rapidity with which they fire, the damage with which they used and not how much the gun looks. you should not ban guns based on w
're going to give it to you. >> brian: education, roads, communication, networks, science, labs, a lot of investment in infrastructure, which means investment infrastructure means do you need revenue? to get revenue, you raise taxes. >> gretchen: you lint like what he was talking about, maybe you liked that it was short. under 20 minutes. we heard that one president in history gave a two-hour speech. >> brian: and he died. >> steve: he did. >> gretchen: he did soon after of pneumonia. let's talk about that whole idea of the middle class, though, because these are the facts, folks. the median household income in 2007 was $54,489. of course, that was before the banks collapsed and before the recession. in 2011, that has gone down to $50,054. that's a huge chunk of change when you're talking about families raising kids, trying to send them to college and trying to feed them. >> steve: because when you look at the middle class, and every class, we really want for everybody in this country is to have a job. we really didn't hear a whole lot about that. we didn't hear much about cutting anyt
for years. is science cology a cult? >> of course it is. of course it is. a system of belief, you got these folks inside this fortress who won't look out, won't look at any criticism and can't bear to -- any investigation and think that everyone is against them. how would you describe that? it's a cult. of course it is. >> well, larry ryan is a pulitzer-prize wing author, his new book is "going clear, scientology, hollywood and the prison of belief." good morning to you, larry. >> good morning. >> pick up with paul haggis left off. he calls scientology a cult. based on your reporting, is that what you would call it? >> i don't use those words, only one opinion that matters about whether it's religion or a cult and that's the irs and they made that decision in 1993 in the nation of 2400 lawsuits from the church and church members. >> concluding it is a religion? >> yes. >> let's talk about what you found in your book. you say you interviewed more than 200 people you looked at thousands of pages of documents. what is the most troublesome practice you say you uncovered through your resea
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. office superstore ink retailer in america. now get $6 back in staples rewards for every ink cartridge you recycle when you spend $50 on hp ink. staples. that was easy. >>> debt ceiling ises much a war of words as it is with numbers. what constitutes a default? and with the economic damage of hitting the ceiling could it be worse than the fiscal cliff? steve liesman has more on that. steve. >> the questions are not easy. they again into sell mandics and have everything to do with if the debt ceiling is solved, and if only for investors, the most important part, what's the economic impact? let's look at some of the rhetoric. the debt ceiling, is it a real tragedy or soap opera? what we have done is graduate the screen
: the national academy of sciences put out a report in 2004 and they could not find any benefit. the entire panel agreed on that. you look at what type of guns get turned then and 99% of the guns are not operational. they are just something that people have around, maybe rusting for decades or something like that so they go and get rid of them. host: georgia, republican -- caller: i have three quick points -- i like the contrast between the differences of semi automatic guns. i would like for someone to define what is an assault rifle. they are all mostly semi automatic so why not call them all assault -- all assault weapons so one abandoned. to me, the background check is not for the mental attitude of an individual. guest: i agree with what the caller was saying. you want to go and ban guns, it should be based on the characteristic of the guns in terms of how they operate. how did they fire bullets, the rapidity with which they fire, the damage whichwith which they used and not how much the gun looks. you should not ban guns based on what it looks like. that is one reason why i don't think anyb
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> let's get a little bit more on the alleged hoax and the mystery surrounding the notre dame football star, manti te'o. >> the university says he's the victim of an online phenomenon in which someone creates a fake social media profile. listen. >> i would refer all of you, if you're not already familiar with it, with both the documentary called "catfish," the mtv show, which is a derivative of that documentary, and the sort of associated things you'll find online and otherwise about catfish or catfishing. >> all right. let's get some more right now with the executive producer of mtv's "catfish," ariel schulman is joining us. ariel, thanks very much for coming in. first of all, explain to our viewers what catfishing is, what "catfish" is all about, how you got this name. >> i mean, it's amazing to me that it's becoming such a used term at this point. it didn't mean anything before the documentary. there's a character who uses it in reference to an old parable about cod fish being transported
cannot find the sciences and mathematicians in the u.s. there are family farms that have shut down. others have moved to mexico because they cannot find the workers. the whole economy is suffering because we cannot grow without immigration. we are steering in the face of a potential great stimulus without it costing at trillion dollars. we have also seen the human complexity of immigration intensified. the kids to have been born here to undocumented parents, the kids who came here when there were four or five years old. parents who have worked in a job for 15 years and are hoping this is their future, that they can be part of the american dream. every single day, it becomes more complicated. until lawmakers act, president, the congress, we are allowed in this humanitarian situation to golan. it strikes me as so un american that we ignore it. ignoring the problem does not make the problem go away. there has been a consensus, i believe, that two things are not going to happen. on one hand, we are not going to run the 12 million people and keep them out of the country. -- ralph up 12
of science and in varmint posts a form of disasters and the environment. after remarks from the head of fema, there'll be a discussion on the effects of hurricane katrina and the tsunami in japan. that is at 8:30 eastern. and c-span2 at 9:00 a.m., the ceo -- the brookings institution conference on the economy. guests will include the chairman of alcoa, procter and gamble, and and nike. >> student camp video entries with your message to the president are now due. get them to cease and by this friday for your chance at the grand prize of $5,000. there is $50,000 in total prices. go to studentcam.org. >> president obama told reporters at the white house that he would be open to using an executive order to raise the legal limit to pay its bills. he also talked about reducing gun violence. president of the united states. >> please have a seat. good morning. i thought it might make sense to take some questions this week as my first term comes to an end. it has been a busy and productive for years. i expect the same thing from i expect the same thing from the
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)